Posted on Categories Coding, Statistics, TutorialsTags , 16 Comments on Efficient accumulation in R

Efficient accumulation in R

R has a number of very good packages for manipulating and aggregating data (dplyr, sqldf, ScaleR, data.table, and more), but when it comes to accumulating results the beginning R user is often at sea. The R execution model is a bit exotic so many R users are very uncertain which methods of accumulating results are efficient and which are inefficient.


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Accumulating wheat (Photo: Cyron Ray Macey, some rights reserved)

In this latest “R as it is” (again in collaboration with our friends at Revolution Analytics) we will quickly become expert at efficiently accumulating results in R. Continue reading Efficient accumulation in R

Posted on Categories Computer Science, Opinion, RantsTags , , , , , 2 Comments on Text encoding is a convoluted mess

Text encoding is a convoluted mess

Modern text encoding is a convoluted mess where costs can easily exceed benefits. I admit we are in a world that has moved beyond ASCII (which at best served only English, and even then without full punctuation). But modern text encoding standards (utf-x, Unicode) have metastasized to the point you spend more time working around them than benefiting from them.


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ASCII Code Chart-Quick ref card” by Namazu-tron – See above description. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons
Continue reading Text encoding is a convoluted mess

Posted on Categories data science, Practical Data Science, Pragmatic Data Science, Pragmatic Machine Learning, StatisticsTags , , , , , , 1 Comment on Working with Sessionized Data 2: Variable Selection

Working with Sessionized Data 2: Variable Selection

In our previous post in this series, we introduced sessionization, or converting log data into a form that’s suitable for analysis. We looked at basic considerations, like dealing with time, choosing an appropriate dataset for training models, and choosing appropriate (and achievable) business goals. In that previous example, we sessionized the data by considering all possible aggregations (window widths) of the data as features. Such naive sessionization can quickly lead to very wide data sets, with potentially more features than you have datums (and collinear features, as well). In this post, we will use the same example, but try to select our features more intelligently.

4203801748 f760c22c47 zIllustration: Boris Artzybasheff
photo: James Vaughan, some rights reserved

The Example Problem

Recall that you have a mobile app with both free (A) and paid (B) actions; if a customer’s tasks involve too many paid actions, they will abandon the app. Your goal is to detect when a customer is in a state when they are likely to abandon, and offer them (perhaps through an in-app ad) a more economical alternative, for example a “Pro User” subscription that allows them to do what they are currently doing at a lower rate. You don’t want to be too aggressive about showing customers this ad, because showing it to someone who doesn’t need the subscription service is likely to antagonize them (and convince them to stop using your app).

You want to build a model that predicts whether a customer will abandon the app (“exit”) within seven days. Your training set is a set of 648 customers who were present on a specific reference day (“day 0”); their activity on day 0 and the ten days previous to that (days 1 through 10), and how many days until each customer exited (Inf for customers who never exit), counting from day 0. For each day, you constructed all possible windows within those ten days, and counted the relative rates of A events and B events in each window. This gives you 132 features per row. You also have a hold-out set of 660 customers, with the same structure. You can download the wide data set used for these examples as an .rData file here. The explanation of the variable names is in the previous post in this series.

In the previous installment, we built a regularized (ridge) logistic regression model over all 132 features. This model didn’t perform too badly, but in general there is more danger of overfitting when working with very wide data sets; in addition, it is quite expensive to analyze a large number of variables with standard implementations of logistic regression. In this installment, we will look for potentially more robust and less expensive ways of analyzing this data.

Continue reading Working with Sessionized Data 2: Variable Selection

Posted on Categories data science, Expository Writing, Practical Data Science, Pragmatic Data Science, Pragmatic Machine Learning, Statistics, Statistics To English Translation, TutorialsTags , , , , , , 2 Comments on Working with Sessionized Data 1: Evaluating Hazard Models

Working with Sessionized Data 1: Evaluating Hazard Models

When we teach data science we emphasize the data scientist’s responsibility to transform available data from multiple systems of record into a wide or denormalized form. In such a “ready to analyze” form each individual example gets a row of data and every fact about the example is a column. Usually transforming data into this form is a matter of performing the equivalent of a number of SQL joins (for example, Lecture 23 (“The Shape of Data”) from our paid video course Introduction to Data Science discusses this).

Doorlog

One notable exception is log data. Log data is a very thin data form where different facts about different individuals are written across many different rows. Converting log data into a ready for analysis form is called sessionizing. We are going to share a short series of articles showing important aspects of sessionizing and modeling log data. Each article will touch on one aspect of the problem in a simplified and idealized setting. In this article we will discuss the importance of dealing with time and of picking a business appropriate goal when evaluating predictive models.

For this article we are going to assume that we have sessionized our data by picking a concrete near-term goal (predicting cancellation of account or “exit” within the next 7 days) and that we have already selected variables for analysis (a number of time-lagged windows of recent log events of various types). We will use a simple model without variable selection as our first example. We will use these results to show how you examine and evaluate these types of models. In later articles we will discuss how you sessionize, how you choose examples, variable selection, and other key topics.

Continue reading Working with Sessionized Data 1: Evaluating Hazard Models

Posted on Categories Exciting Techniques, math programming, Mathematics, StatisticsTags , , , , , 2 Comments on A dynamic programming solution to A/B test design

A dynamic programming solution to A/B test design

Our last article on A/B testing described the scope of the realistic circumstances of A/B testing in practice and gave links to different standard solutions. In this article we will be take an idealized specific situation allowing us to show a particularly beautiful solution to one very special type of A/B test.

For this article we are assigning two different advertising message to our potential customers. The first message, called “A”, we have been using a long time, and we have a very good estimate at what rate it generates sales (we are going to assume all sales are for exactly $1, so all we are trying to estimate rates or probabilities). We have a new proposed advertising message, called “B”, and we wish to know does B convert traffic to sales at a higher rate than A?

We are assuming:

  • We know exact rate of A events.
  • We know exactly how long we are going to be in this business (how many potential customers we will ever attempt to message, or the total number of events we will ever process).
  • The goal is to maximize expected revenue over the lifetime of the project.

As we wrote in our previous article: in practice you usually do not know the answers to the above questions. There is always uncertainty in the value of the A-group, you never know how long you are going to run the business (in terms of events or in terms of time, and you would also want to time-discount any far future revenue), and often you value things other than revenue (valuing knowing if B is greater than A, or even maximizing risk adjusted returns instead of gross returns). This represents severe idealization of the A/B testing problem, one that will let us solve the problem exactly using fairly simple R code. The solution comes from the theory of binomial option pricing (which is in turn related to Pascal’s triangle).


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Yang Hui (ca. 1238–1298) (Pascal’s) triangle, as depicted by the Chinese using rod numerals.

For this “statistics as it should be” (in partnership with Revolution Analytics) article let us work the problem (using R) pretending things are this simple. Continue reading A dynamic programming solution to A/B test design