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R tip: Make Your Results Clear with sigr

R is designed to make working with statistical models fast, succinct, and reliable.

For instance building a model is a one-liner:

model <- lm(Petal.Length ~ Sepal.Length, data = iris)

And producing a detailed diagnostic summary of the model is also a one-liner:

summary(model)

# Call:
# lm(formula = Petal.Length ~ Sepal.Length, data = iris)
# 
# Residuals:
#      Min       1Q   Median       3Q      Max 
# -2.47747 -0.59072 -0.00668  0.60484  2.49512 
# 
# Coefficients:
#              Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
# (Intercept)  -7.10144    0.50666  -14.02   <2e-16 ***
# Sepal.Length  1.85843    0.08586   21.65   <2e-16 ***
# ---
# Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1
# 
# Residual standard error: 0.8678 on 148 degrees of freedom
# Multiple R-squared:   0.76,   Adjusted R-squared:  0.7583 
# F-statistic: 468.6 on 1 and 148 DF,  p-value: < 2.2e-16

However, useful as the above is: it isn’t exactly presentation ready. To formally report the R-squared of our model we would have to cut and paste this information from the summary. That is a needlessly laborious and possibly error-prone step.

With the sigr package this can be made much easier:

library("sigr")
Rsquared <- wrapFTest(model)
print(Rsquared)

# [1] "F Test summary: (R2=0.76, F(1,148)=468.6, p<1e-05)."

And this formal summary can be directly rendered into many formats (Latex, html, markdown, and ascii).

render(Rsquared, format="html")

F Test summary: (R2=0.76, F(1,148)=468.6, p<1e-05).

sigr can help make your publication workflow much easier and more repeatable/reliable.

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