Posted on Categories Opinion, Programming, TutorialsTags , , 1 Comment on Make Teaching R Quasi-Quotation Easier

Make Teaching R Quasi-Quotation Easier

To make teaching R quasi-quotation easier it would be nice if R string-interpolation and quasi-quotation both used the same notation. They are related concepts. So some commonality of notation would actually be clarifying, and help teach the concepts. We will define both of the above terms, and demonstrate the relation between the two concepts.

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Posted on Categories Programming, TutorialsTags , , , Leave a comment on R Tip: Use Inline Operators For Legibility

R Tip: Use Inline Operators For Legibility

R Tip: use inline operators for legibility.

A Python feature I miss when working in R is the convenience of Python‘s inline + operator. In Python, + does the right thing for some built in data types:

  • It concatenates lists: [1,2] + [3] is [1, 2, 3].
  • It concatenates strings: 'a' + 'b' is 'ab'.

And, of course, it adds numbers: 1 + 2 is 3.

The inline notation is very convenient and legible. In this note we will show how to use a related notation R.

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Posted on Categories Administrativia, data science, Practical Data Science, StatisticsTags , 1 Comment on Practical Data Science with R, 2nd Edition discount!

Practical Data Science with R, 2nd Edition discount!

Please help share our news and this discount.

The second edition of our best-selling book Practical Data Science with R2, Zumel, Mount is featured as deal of the day at Manning.

NewImage

The second edition isn’t finished yet, but chapters 1 through 4 are available in the Manning Early Access Program (MEAP), and we have finished chapters 5 and 6 which are now in production at Manning (so they should be available soon). The authors are hard at work on chapters 7 and 8 right now.

The discount gets you half off. Also the 2nd edition comes with a free e-copy the first edition (so you can jump ahead).

Here are the details in Tweetable form:

Deal of the Day January 13: Half off Practical Data Science with R, Second Edition. Use code dotd011319au at http://bit.ly/2SKAxe9.

Posted on Categories ProgrammingTags , , 2 Comments on R Tip: Use seqi() For Indexes

R Tip: Use seqi() For Indexes

R Tip: use seqi() for indexing.

R‘s 1:0 trap” is a mal-feature that confuses newcomers and is a reliable source of bugs. This note will show how to use seqi() to write more reliable code and document intent.

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Posted on Categories Mathematics, Opinion, TutorialsTags , , Leave a comment on A Beautiful 2 by 2 Matrix Identity

A Beautiful 2 by 2 Matrix Identity

While working on a variation of the RcppDynProg algorithm we derived the following beautiful identity of 2 by 2 real matrices:

The superscript “top” denoting the transpose operation, the ||.||^2_2 denoting sum of squares norm, and the single |.| denoting determinant.

This is derived from one of the check equations for the Moore–Penrose inverse and we have details of the derivation here, and details of the messy algebra here.

Posted on Categories Coding, Opinion, TutorialsTags , , , 7 Comments on Timing the Same Algorithm in R, Python, and C++

Timing the Same Algorithm in R, Python, and C++

While developing the RcppDynProg R package I took a little extra time to port the core algorithm from C++ to both R and Python.

This means I can time the exact same algorithm implemented nearly identically in each of these three languages. So I can extract some comparative “apples to apples” timings. Please read on for a summary of the results.

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Posted on Categories Programming, Statistics, Tutorials, UncategorizedTags , 4 Comments on What does it mean to write “vectorized” code in R?

What does it mean to write “vectorized” code in R?

One often hears that R can not be fast (false), or more correctly that for fast code in R you may have to consider “vectorizing.”

A lot of knowledgable R users are not comfortable with the term “vectorize”, and not really familiar with the method.

“Vectorize” is just a slightly high-handed way of saying:

R naturally stores data in columns (or in column major order), so if you are not coding to that pattern you are fighting the language.

In this article we will make the above clear by working through a non-trivial example of writing vectorized code.

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