All posts by John Mount

Using closures as objects in R

For more and more clients we have been using a nice coding pattern taught to us by Garrett Grolemund in his book Hands-On Programming with R: make a function that returns a list of functions. This turns out to be a classic functional programming techique: use closures to implement objects (terminology we will explain).

It is a pattern we strongly recommend, but with one caveat: it can leak references similar to the manner described in here. Once you work out how to stomp out the reference leaks the “function that returns a list of functions” pattern is really strong.

We will discuss this programming pattern and how to use it effectively. Continue reading Using closures as objects in R

One place not to use the Sharpe ratio

Having worked in finance I am a public fan of the Sharpe ratio. I have written about this here and here.

One thing I have often forgotten (driving some bad analyses) is: the Sharpe ratio isn’t appropriate for models of repeated events that already have linked mean and variance (such as Poisson or Binomial models) or situations where the variance is very small (with respect to the mean or expectation). These are common situations in a number of large scale online advertising problems (such as modeling the response rate to online advertisements or email campaigns).


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Photo “eggs in a basket” copyright MicoAssist appropriate CC license

In this note we will quickly explain the problem. Continue reading One place not to use the Sharpe ratio

The Win-Vector R data science value pack

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Please share and Tweet! Continue reading The Win-Vector R data science value pack

How sure are you that large margin implies low VC dimension?

How sure are you that large margin implies low VC dimension (and good generalization error)? It is true. But even if you have taken a good course on machine learning you many have seen the actual proof (with all of the caveats and conditions). I worked through the literature proofs over the holiday and it took a lot of notes to track what is really going on in the derivation of the support vector machine.


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Figure: the standard SVM margin diagram, this time with some un-marked data added.
Continue reading How sure are you that large margin implies low VC dimension?

Soft margin is not as good as hard margin

This note is a link to an excerpt from my upcoming monster support vector machine article where I work through a number of sections of [Vapnik, 1998] Vapnik, V. N. (1998), Statistical Learning Theory, Wiley. I try to run down how the original theoretical claims are precisely linked to what is said about the common implementations. The write-up is fairly technical and very large (26 pages).

Here we are extracting an appendix: “Soft margin is not as good as hard margin.” In it we build a toy problem that is not large-margin separated and note that if the dimension of the concept space you were working in was not obvious (i.e. you were forced to rely on the margin derived portion of generalization bounds) then generalization improvement for a soft margin SVM is much slower than you would expect given experience from the hard margin theorems. The punch-line is: every time you get eight times as much training data you only halve your expected excess generalization error bound (whereas once you get below a data-set’s hard-margin bound you expect one to one reduction of the bound with respect to training data set size). What this points out is: the soft margin idea can simulate margin, but it comes at a cost. Continue reading Soft margin is not as good as hard margin

R bracket is a bit irregular

While skimming Professor Hadley Wickham’s Advanced R I got to thinking about nature of the square-bracket or extract operator in R. It turns out “[,]” is a bit more irregular than I remembered.

The subsetting section of Advanced R has a very good discussion on the subsetting and selection operators found in R. In particular it raises the important distinction of two simultaneously valuable but incompatible desiderata: simplification of results versus preservation of results. Continue reading R bracket is a bit irregular

Let’s try to motivate schemes

Recently there has been some controversy over David Mumford’s Nature magazine invited obituary of Alexander Grothendieck being initially rejected on submission (see here and here). At issue was the attempt to explain the mathematical idea of schemes (one of Alexander Grothendieck’s most important contributions) to a non-mathematician audience. Professor Mumford is a mathematician of great stature and his explanation is better than anything I could even attempt. However, in addition to the issues he raises I don’t think he was sensitive enough to what a non-mathematician considers motivation.

I’ll take a quick stab at explaining a very tiny bit of the motivation of schemes. I not sure the kind of chain of analogies argument I am attempting would work in an obituary (or in a short length), so I certainly don’t presume to advise professor Mumford on his obituary of a great mathematician (and person). Continue reading Let’s try to motivate schemes