All posts by Nina Zumel

The Geometry of Classifiers

As John mentioned in his last post, we have been quite interested in the recent study by Fernandez-Delgado, et.al., “Do we Need Hundreds of Classifiers to Solve Real World Classification Problems?” (the “DWN study” for short), which evaluated 179 popular implementations of common classification algorithms over 120 or so data sets, mostly from the UCI Machine Learning Repository. For fun, we decided to do a follow-up study, using their data and several classifier implementations from scikit-learn, the Python machine learning library. We were interested not just in classifier accuracy, but also in seeing if there is a “geometry” of classifiers: which classifiers produce predictions patterns that look similar to each other, and which classifiers produce predictions that are quite different? To examine these questions, we put together a Shiny app to interactively explore how the relative behavior of classifiers changes for different types of data sets.

Continue reading The Geometry of Classifiers

Estimating Generalization Error with the PRESS statistic

As we’ve mentioned on previous occasions, one of the defining characteristics of data science is the emphasis on the availability of “large” data sets, which we define as “enough data that statistical efficiency is not a concern” (note that a “large” data set need not be “big data,” however you choose to define it). In particular, we advocate the use of hold-out data to evaluate the performance of models.

There is one caveat: if you are evaluating a series of models to pick the best (and you usually are), then a single hold-out set is strictly speaking not enough. Hastie, et.al, say it best:

Ideally, the test set should be kept in a “vault,” and be brought out only at the end of the data analysis. Suppose instead that we use the test-set repeatedly, choosing the model with smallest test-set error. Then the test set error of the final chosen model will underestimate the true test error, sometimes substantially.

– Hastie, Tibshirani and Friedman, The Elements of Statistical Learning, 2nd edition.

The ideal way to select a model from a set of candidates (or set parameters for a model, for example the regularization constant) is to use a training set to train the model(s), a calibration set to select the model or choose parameters, and a test set to estimate the generalization error of the final model.

In many situations, breaking your data into three sets may not be practical: you may not have very much data, or the the phenomena you’re interested in are rare enough that you need a lot of data to detect them. In those cases, you will need more statistically efficient estimates for generalization error or goodness-of-fit. In this article, we look at the PRESS statistic, and how to use it to estimate generalization error and choose between models.

Continue reading Estimating Generalization Error with the PRESS statistic

Vtreat: designing a package for variable treatment

When you apply machine learning algorithms on a regular basis, on a wide variety of data sets, you find that certain data issues come up again and again:

  • Missing values (NA or blanks)
  • Problematic numerical values (Inf, NaN, sentinel values like 999999999 or -1)
  • Valid categorical levels that don’t appear in the training data (especially when there are rare levels, or a large number of levels)
  • Invalid values

Of course, you should examine the data to understand the nature of the data issues: are the missing values missing at random, or are they systematic? What are the valid ranges for the numerical data? Are there sentinel values, what are they, and what do they mean? What are the valid values for text fields? Do we know all the valid values for a categorical variable, and are there any missing? Is there any principled way to roll up category levels? In the end though, the steps you take to deal with these issues will often be the same from data set to data set, so having a package of ready-to-go functions for data treatment is useful. In this article, we will discuss some of our usual data treatment procedures, and describe a prototype R package that implements them.

Continue reading Vtreat: designing a package for variable treatment

Trimming the Fat from glm() Models in R

One of the attractive aspects of logistic regression models (and linear models in general) is their compactness: the size of the model grows in the number of coefficients, not in the size of the training data. With R, though, glm models are not so concise; we noticed this to our dismay when we tried to automate fitting a moderate number of models (about 500 models, with on the order of 50 coefficients) to data sets of moderate size (several tens of thousands of rows). A workspace save of the models alone was in the tens of gigabytes! How is this possible? We decided to find out.

As many R users know (but often forget), a glm model object carries a copy of its training data by default. You can use the settings y=FALSE and model=FALSE to turn this off.

set.seed(2325235)


# Set up a synthetic classification problem of a given size
# and two variables: one numeric, one categorical
# (two levels).
synthFrame = function(nrows) {
   d = data.frame(xN=rnorm(nrows),
      xC=sample(c('a','b'),size=nrows,replace=TRUE))
   d$y = (d$xN + ifelse(d$xC=='a',0.2,-0.2) + rnorm(nrows))>0.5
   d
}


# first show that model=F and y=F help reduce model size

dTrain = synthFrame(1000)
model1 = glm(y~xN+xC,data=dTrain,family=binomial(link='logit'))
model2 = glm(y~xN+xC,data=dTrain,family=binomial(link='logit'),
             y=FALSE)
model3 = glm(y~xN+xC,data=dTrain,family=binomial(link='logit'),
              y=FALSE, model=FALSE)

#
# Estimate the object's size as the size of its serialization
#
length(serialize(model1, NULL))
# [1] 225251
length(serialize(model2, NULL))
# [1] 206341
length(serialize(model3, NULL))
# [1] 189562

dTest = synthFrame(100)
p1 = predict(model1, newdata=dTest, type='response')
p2 = predict(model2, newdata=dTest, type='response')
p3 = predict(model3, newdata=dTest, type='response')
sum(abs(p1-p2))
# [1] 0
sum(abs(p1-p3))
# [1] 0

Continue reading Trimming the Fat from glm() Models in R

Bandit Formulations for A/B Tests: Some Intuition

Controlled experiments embody the best scientific design for establishing a causal relationship between changes and their influence on user-observable behavior.

– Kohavi, Henne, Sommerfeld, “Practical Guide to Controlled Experiments on the Web” (2007)

A/B tests are one of the simplest ways of running controlled experiments to evaluate the efficacy of a proposed improvement (a new medicine, compared to an old one; a promotional campaign; a change to a website). To run an A/B test, you split your population into a control group (let’s call them “A”) and a treatment group (“B”). The A group gets the “old” protocol, the B group gets the proposed improvement, and you collect data on the outcome that you are trying to achieve: the rate that patients are cured; the amount of money customers spend; the rate at which people who come to your website actually complete a transaction. In the traditional formulation of A/B tests, you measure the outcomes for the A and B groups, determine which is better (if either), and whether or not the difference observed is statistically significant. This leads to questions of test size: how big a population do you need to get reliably detect a difference to the desired statistical significance? And to answer that question, you need to know how big a difference (effect size) matters to you.

The irony is that to detect small differences accurately you need a larger population size, even though in many cases, if the difference is small, picking the wrong answer matters less. It can be easy to lose sight of that observation in the struggle to determine correct experiment sizes.

There is an alternative formulation for A/B tests that is especially suitable for online situations, and that explicitly takes the above observation into account: the so-called multi-armed bandit problem. Imagine that you are in a casino, faced with K slot machines (which used to be called “one-armed bandits” because they had a lever that you pulled to play (the “arm”) — and they pretty much rob you of all your money). Each of the slot machines pays off at a different (unknown) rate. You want to figure out which of the machines pays off at the highest rate, then switch to that one — but you don’t want to lose too much money to the suboptimal slot machines while doing so. What’s the best strategy?

NewImage

The “pulling one lever at a time” formulation isn’t a bad way of thinking about online transactions (as opposed to drug trials); you can imagine all your customers arriving at your site sequentially, and being sent to bandit A or bandit B according to some strategy. Note also, that if the best bandit and the second-best bandit have very similar payoff rates, then settling on the second best bandit, while not optimal, isn’t necessarily that bad a strategy. You lose winnings — but not much.

Traditionally, bandit games are infinitely long, so analysis of bandit strategies is asymptotic. The idea is that you test less as the game continues — but the testing stage can go on for a very long time (often interleaved with periods of pure exploitation, or playing the best bandit). This infinite-game assumption isn’t always tenable for A/B tests — for one thing, the world changes; for another, testing is not necessarily without cost. We’ll look at finite games below.

Continue reading Bandit Formulations for A/B Tests: Some Intuition

Practical Data Science with R: Release date announced

PracticalDataScienceCover

It took a little longer than we’d hoped, but we did it! Practical Data Science with R will be released on April 2nd (physical version). The eBook version will follow soon after, on April 15th. You can preorder the pBook now on the Manning book page. The physical version comes with a complimentary eBook version (when the eBook is released), in all three formats: PDF, ePub, and Kindle.

If you haven’t yet, order it now!

(softbound 416 pages, black and white; includes access to color PDF, ePub and Kindle when available)

The Statistics behind “Verification by Multiplicity”

There’s a new post up at the ninazumel.com blog that looks at the statistics of “verification by multiplicity” — the statistical technique that is behind NASA’s announcement of 715 new planets that have been validated in the data from the Kepler Space Telescope.

We normally don’t write about science here at Win-Vector, but we do sometimes examine the statistics and statistical methods behind scientific announcements and issues. NASA’s new technique is a cute and relatively straightforward (statistically speaking) approach.

From what I understand of the introduction to the paper, there are two ways to determine whether or not a planet candidate is really a planet: the first is to confirm the fact with additional measurements of the target star’s gravitational wobble, or by measurements of the transit times of the apparent planets across the face of the star. Getting sufficient measurements can take time. The other way is to “validate” the planet by showing that it’s highly unlikely that the sighting was a false positive. Specifically, the probability that the signal observed was caused by a planet should be at least 100 times larger than the probability that the signal is a false positive. The validation analysis is a Bayesian approach that considers various mechanisms that produce false positives, determines the probability that these various mechanisms could have produced the signal in question, and compares them to the probability that a planet produced the signal.

The basic idea behind verification by multiplicity is that planets are often clustered in multi-planet star systems, while false positive measurements (mistaken identification of potential planets) occur randomly. Putting this another way: if false positives are random, then they won’t tend to occur together near the same star. So if you observe a star with multiple “planet signals,” it’s unlikely that all the signals are false positives. We can use that observation to quantify how much more likely it is that a star with multiple candidates actually hosts a planet. The resulting probability can be used as an improved prior for the planet model when doing the statistical validation described above.

You can read the rest of the article here.

The Extra Step: Graphs for Communication versus Exploration

Visualization is a useful tool for data exploration and statistical analysis, and it’s an important method for communicating your discoveries to others. While those two uses of visualization are related, they aren’t identical.

One of the reasons that I like ggplot so much is that it excels at layering together multiple views and summaries of data in ways that improve both data exploration and communication. Of course, getting at the right graph can be a bit of work, and often I will stop when I get to a visualization that tells me what I need to know — even if no one can read that graph but me. In this post I’ll look at a couple of ggplot graphs that take the extra step: communicating effectively to others.

For my examples I’ll use a pre-treated sample from the 2011 U.S. Census American Community Survey. The dataset is available as an R object in the file phsample.RData; the data dictionary and additional information can be found here. Information about getting the original source data from the U.S. Census site is at the bottom of this post.

The file phsample.RData contains two data frames: dhus (household information), and dpus (information about individuals; they are joined to households using the column SERIALNO). We will only use the dhus data frame.

library(ggplot2)
load("phsample.RData")

# Restrict to non-institutional households
# (No jails, schools, convalescent homes, vacant residences)
hhonly = subset(dhus, (dhus$TYPE==1) &(dhus$NP > 0))

Continue reading The Extra Step: Graphs for Communication versus Exploration

Big News! Practical Data Science with R is content complete!

The last appendix has gone to the editors; the book is now content complete. What a relief!

We are hoping to release the book late in the first quarter of next year. In the meantime, you can still get early drafts of our chapters through Manning’s Early Access program, if you haven’t yet. The link is here.

We look forward to sharing the final version of the book with you next year.

On Writing Our Book: A Little Philosophy

We recently got this question from a subscriber to our book:

… will you in any way describe what subject areas, backgrounds, courses etc. would help a non data scientist prepare themselves to at least understand at a deeper level why they techniques you will discuss work…and also understand the boundary conditions and limits of the models etc….. ?

[…] I would love to understand what I could review first to better prepare to extract the most from it.

It’s a good question, and it raises an interesting philosophical point. To read our book, it will of course help to know a little bit about statistics and probability, and to be familiar with R and/or with programming in general. But we do plan on introducing the necessary concepts as needed into our discussion, so we don’t consider these subjects to be “pre-requisites” in a strict sense.

Part of our reason for writing this book is to make reading about statistics/probability and machine learning easier. That is, we hope that if you read our book, other reference books and textbooks will make more sense, because we have given you a concrete context for the abstract concepts that the reference books cover.

So, my advice to our subscriber was to keep his references handy as he read our book, rather than trying to brush up on all the “pre-requisite” subjects first.

Of course, everyone learns differently, and we’d like to know what other readers think. What (if anything) would you consider “pre-requisites” to our book? What would you consider good companion references?

If you are subscribed to our book, please join the conversation, or post other comments on the Practical Data Science with R author’s forum. Your input will help us write a better book; we look forward to hearing from you.