Posted on Categories Coding, Computer Science, Computers, Opinion, Programming, RantsTags , ,

I am done with 32 bit machines

I am going to come-out and say it: I am emotionally done with 32 bit machines and operating systems. My sympathy for them is at an end.

I know that ARM is still 32 bit, but in that case you get something big back in exchange: the ability to deploy on smartphones and tablets. For PCs and servers 32 bit addressing’s time is long past, yet we still have to code for and regularly run into these machines and operating systems. The time/space savings of 32 bit representations is nothing compared to the loss of capability in sticking with that architecture and the wasted effort in coding around it. My work is largely data analysis in a server environment, and it is just getting ridiculous to not be able to always assume at least a 64 bit machine. Continue reading I am done with 32 bit machines

Posted on Categories Mathematics, Programming, StatisticsTags , , 1 Comment on A bit more on impact coding

A bit more on impact coding

Dr. Nina Zumel recently published an excellent tutorial on a modeling technique she called impact coding. It is a pragmatic machine learning technique that has helped with more than one client project. Impact coding is a bridge from Naive Bayes (where each variable’s impact is added without regard to the known effects of any other variable) to Logistic Regression (where dependencies between variables and levels is completely accounted). A natural question is can pick up more of the positive features of each model? Continue reading A bit more on impact coding

Posted on Categories Computers, Exciting Techniques, Programming, Public Service Article, Rants, TutorialsTags , , , 5 Comments on Minimal Version Control Lesson: Use It

Minimal Version Control Lesson: Use It

There is no excuse for a digital creative person to not use some sort of version control or source control. In the past disk space was too dear, version control systems were too expensive and software was not powerful enough; this is no longer the case. Unless your work is worthless both back it up and version control it. We will demonstrate a minimal set of version control commands that will one day save your bacon. Continue reading Minimal Version Control Lesson: Use It

Posted on Categories Coding, Computer Science, Programming, TutorialsTags , , , , ,

What to do when you run out of memory

A constant problem for computer science (since its inception) is how to manipulate data that is larger than machine memory. We present here some general strategies for working “out of core” or what you should do when you run out of memory.

Early computers were most limited by their paltry memory sizes. von Neumann himself commented that even a room full of genius mathematicians would not be capable of much if all they could communicate, think upon or remember were the characters on a single type written page (much more memory than the few hundred words available to the Eniac). The most visible portions of early computers are their external memories or secondary stores: card readers, paper tape readers and tape drives.


IMG 0062

SDC 920 computer, Computer History Museum, Mountain View CA

Historically computer scientists have concentrated on streaming or online algorithms (that is algorithms that work with the data in the order it is available and use limited memory). For many problems we have found this an insufficient model and it is much better to assume you can re-order and replicate data (such as scattering data to many processors and re-collecting it to sort). The scatter/gather paradigm is ubiquitous and is the underpinning of large scale sorting, databases and Map Reduce. So in one sense databases and Map Reduce different APIs on top of very related technologies (journaling, splitting and merging). Replicating data (or even delaying duplicate elimination) that is already “too large to handle” may seem counterintuitive; but it is exploiting the primary property of secondary storage: that secondary storage tends to be much larger than primary storage (typically by 2 orders of magnitude, compare a 2 terabyte drive to an 8 gigabyte memory stick). Continue reading What to do when you run out of memory

Posted on Categories Computer Science, Computers, Opinion, ProgrammingTags , , , 1 Comment on “The Mythical Man Month” is still a good read

“The Mythical Man Month” is still a good read

Re-read Fred Brooks “The Mythical Man Month” over vacation. ¬†Book remains insightful about computer science and project management. Continue reading “The Mythical Man Month” is still a good read

Posted on Categories Computer Science, Programming, Statistics, TutorialsTags , , , 1 Comment on Programmers Should Know R

Programmers Should Know R

Programmers should definitely know how to use R. I don’t mean they should switch from their current language to R, but they should think of R as a handy tool during development. Continue reading Programmers Should Know R

Posted on Categories Pragmatic Machine Learning, Programming, TutorialsTags , , , , , 2 Comments on SQL Screwdriver

SQL Screwdriver

We discuss a “medium scale data” technique that we call “SQL Screwdriver.”

Previously we discussed some of the issues of large scale data analytics. A lot of the work done at the MapReduce scale is necessarily limited to mere aggregation and report generation. But what of medium scale? That is data too large to perform all steps in your favorite tool (R, Excel or something else) but small enough that you are expected to produce sophisticated models, decisions and analysis. At this scale, if properly prepared, you don’t need large scale tools and their limitations. With extra preparation you can continue to use your preferred tools. We call this the realm of medium scale data and discuss a preparation tool style we call “screwdriver” (as opposed to larger hammers).

We stand the “no SQL” movement on its head and discuss the beneficial use of SQL without a server (as opposed to their vision of a key-value store without SQL). Database servers can be a nuisance- but that is not enough reason to give up the power of relational query languages.
Continue reading SQL Screwdriver

Posted on Categories math programming, Programming, StatisticsTags , , , , , , , ,

Large Data Logistic Regression (with example Hadoop code)

Living in the age of big data we ask what to do when we have the good fortune to be presented with a huge amount of supervised training data? Most often at large scale we are presented with the un-supervised problems of characterization and information extraction; but some problem domains offer an almost limitless supply of supervised training data (such as using older data to build models that predict the near future). Having too much training data is a good problem to have and there are ways to use traditional methods (like logistic regression) at this scale. We present an “out of core” logistic regression implementation and a quick example in Apache Hadoop running on Amazon Elastic MapReduce. This presentation assumes familiarity with Unix style command lines, Java and Hadoop.

Continue reading Large Data Logistic Regression (with example Hadoop code)