Baking priors

By: , October 13th, 2015.


There remains a bit of a two-way snobbery that Frequentist statistics is what we teach (as so-called objective statistics remain the same no matter who works with them) and Bayesian statistics is what we do (as it tends to directly estimate posterior probabilities we are actually interested in). Nina Zumel hit the nail on the head when she wrote an article explaining the appropriateness of the type of statistical theory depends on the type of question you are trying to answer, not on your personal prejudices.

We will discuss a few more examples that have been in our mind, including one I am calling “baking priors.” This final example will demonstrate some of the advantages of allowing researchers to document their priors.

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Figure 1: two loaves of bread.
Continue reading Baking priors

Thumbs up for Anaconda

By: , October 10th, 2015.


One of the things I like about R is: because it is not used for systems programming you can expect to install your own current version of R without interference from some system version of R that is deliberately being held back at some older version (for reasons of script compatibility). R is conveniently distributed as a single package (with automated install of additional libraries).

Want to do some data analysis? Install R, load your data, and go. You don’t expect to spend hours on system administration just to get back to your task.

Python, being a popular general purpose language does not have this advantage, but thanks to Anaconda from Continuum Analytics you can skip (or at least delegate) a lot of the system environment imposed pain. With Anaconda trying out Python packages (Jupyter, scikit-learn, pandas, numpy, sympy, cvxopt, bokeh, and more) becomes safe and pleasant. Continue reading Thumbs up for Anaconda

I was wrong about statistics

By: , August 3rd, 2015.


I’ll admit it: I have been wrong about statistics. However, that isn’t what this article is about. This article is less about some of the statistical mistakes I have made, as a mere working data scientist, and more of a rant about the hectoring tone of corrections from some statisticians (both when I have been right and when I have been wrong).

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Used wrong (image Justin Baeder, some rights reserved).

Continue reading I was wrong about statistics

Text encoding is a convoluted mess

By: , July 25th, 2015.


Modern text encoding is a convoluted mess where costs can easily exceed benefits. I admit we are in a world that has moved beyond ASCII (which at best served only English, and even then without full punctuation). But modern text encoding standards (utf-x, Unicode) have metastasized to the point you spend more time working around them than benefiting from them.

ASCII Code Chart-Quick ref card” by Namazu-tron – See above description. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons
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I do not believe Google invented the term A/B test

By: , June 12th, 2015.


The June 4, 2015 Wikipedia entry on A/B Testing claims Google data scientists were the origin of the term “A/B test”:

Google data scientists ran their first A/B test at the turn of the millennium to determine the optimum number of results to display on a search engine results page.[citation needed] While this was the origin of the term, very similar methods had been used by marketers long before “A/B test” was coined. Common terms used before the internet era were “split test” and “bucket test”.

It is very unlikely Google data scientists were the first to use the informal shorthand “A/B test.” Test groups have been routinely called “A” and “B” at least as early as the 1940s. So it would be natural for any working group to informally call their test comparing abstract groups “A” and “B” an “A/B test” from time to time. Statisticians are famous for using the names of variables (merely chosen by convention) as formal names of procedures (p-values, t-tests, and many more).

Even if other terms were dominant in earlier writing, it is likely A/B test was used in speech. And writings of our time are sufficiently informal (or like speech) that they should be compared to earlier speech, not just earlier formal writing.

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That being said, a quick search yields some examples of previous use. We list but a few below. Continue reading I do not believe Google invented the term A/B test

My favorite R bug

By: , May 23rd, 2015.


In this note am going to recount “my favorite R bug.” It isn’t a bug in R. It is a bug in some code I wrote in R. I call it my favorite bug, as it is easy to commit and (thanks to R’s overly helpful nature) takes longer than it should to find.

H96566k Continue reading My favorite R bug

R bracket is a bit irregular

By: , January 17th, 2015.


While skimming Professor Hadley Wickham’s Advanced R I got to thinking about nature of the square-bracket or extract operator in R. It turns out “[,]” is a bit more irregular than I remembered.

The subsetting section of Advanced R has a very good discussion on the subsetting and selection operators found in R. In particular it raises the important distinction of two simultaneously valuable but incompatible desiderata: simplification of results versus preservation of results. Continue reading R bracket is a bit irregular

Excel spreadsheets are hard to get right

By: , November 18th, 2014.


Any practicing data scientist is going to eventually have to work with a data stored in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. A lot of analysts use this format, so if you work with others you are going to run into it. We have already written how we don’t recommend using Excel-like formats to exchange data. But we know if you are going to work with others you are going to have to make accommodations (we even built our own modified version of gdata‘s underlying Perl script to work around a bug).

But one thing that continues to confound us is how hard it is to read Excel data correctly. When Excel exports into CSV/TSV style formats it uses fairly clever escaping rules about quotes and new-lines. Most CSV/TSV readers fail to correctly implement these rules and often fail on fields that contain actual quote characters, separators (tab or comma), or new-lines. Another issue is Excel itself often transforms data without any user verification or control. For example: Excel routinely turns date-like strings into time since epoch (which it then renders as a date). We recently ran into another uncontrollable Excel transform: changing the strings “TRUE” and “FALSE” into 1 and 0 inside the actual “.xlsx” file. That is Excel does not faithfully store the strings “TRUE” and “FALSE” even in its native format. Most Excel users do not know about this, so they certainly are in no position to warn you about it.

This would be a mere annoyance, except it turns out Libre Office (or at least LibreOffice_4.3.4_MacOS_x86-64) has a severe and silent data mangling bug on this surprising Microsoft boolean type.

We first ran into this in client data (and once the bug triggered it seemed to alter most of the columns), but it turns out the bug is very easy to trigger. In this note we will demonstrate the data representation issue and bug. Continue reading Excel spreadsheets are hard to get right