Posted on Categories Coding, data science, Opinion, Programming, Statistics, TutorialsTags , , , , 13 Comments on Tutorial: Using seplyr to Program Over dplyr

Tutorial: Using seplyr to Program Over dplyr

seplyr is an R package that makes it easy to program over dplyr 0.7.*.

To illustrate this we will work an example.

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Posted on Categories Administrativia, Exciting Techniques, Statistics, TutorialsTags , , 1 Comment on seplyr update

seplyr update

The development version of my new R package seplyr is performing in practical applications with dplyr 0.7.* much better than even I (the seplyr package author) expected.

I think I have hit a very good set of trade-offs, and I have now spent significant time creating documentation and examples.

I wish there had been such a package weeks ago, and that I had started using this approach in my own client work at that time. If you are already a dplyr user I strongly suggest trying seplyr in your own analysis projects.

Please see here for details.

Posted on Categories data science, Opinion, Programming, Statistics, TutorialsTags , , , , 12 Comments on dplyr 0.7 Made Simpler

dplyr 0.7 Made Simpler

I have been writing a lot (too much) on the R topics dplyr/rlang/tidyeval lately. The reason is: major changes were recently announced. If you are going to use dplyr well and correctly going forward you may need to understand some of the new issues (if you don’t use dplyr you can safely skip all of this). I am trying to work out (publicly) how to best incorporate the new methods into:

  • real world analyses,
  • reusable packages,
  • and teaching materials.

I think some of the apparent discomfort on my part comes from my feeling that dplyr never really gave standard evaluation (SE) a fair chance. In my opinion: dplyr is based strongly on non-standard evaluation (NSE, originally through lazyeval and now through rlang/tidyeval) more by the taste and choice than by actual analyst benefit or need. dplyr isn’t my package, so it isn’t my choice to make; but I can still have an informed opinion, which I will discuss below.

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Posted on Categories data science, Statistics, TutorialsTags , , , 10 Comments on Better Grouped Summaries in dplyr

Better Grouped Summaries in dplyr

For R dplyr users one of the promises of the new rlang/tidyeval system is an improved ability to program over dplyr itself. In particular to add new verbs that encapsulate previously compound steps into better self-documenting atomic steps.

Let’s take a look at this capability.

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Posted on Categories Opinion, Programming, Statistics, TutorialsTags , , , 8 Comments on In praise of syntactic sugar

In praise of syntactic sugar

There has been some talk of adding native pipe notation to R (for example here, here, and here). And even a tidyeval/rlang pipe here.

I think a critical aspect of such an extension would be to treat such a notation as syntactic sugar and not insist such a pipe match magrittr semantics, or worse yet give a platform for authors to insert their own preferred ad-hoc semantics. Continue reading In praise of syntactic sugar

Posted on Categories data science, Practical Data Science, Pragmatic Data Science, Programming, Statistics, TutorialsTags , , , , , 1 Comment on Join Dependency Sorting

Join Dependency Sorting

In our latest installment of “R and big data” let’s again discuss the task of left joining many tables from a data warehouse using R and a system called "a join controller" (last discussed here).

One of the great advantages to specifying complicated sequences of operations in data (rather than in code) is: it is often easier to transform and extend data. Explicit rich data beats vague convention and complicated code.

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Posted on Categories Coding, Programming, Statistics, TutorialsTags , , , Leave a comment on wrapr Implementation Update

wrapr Implementation Update

Introduction

The development version CRAN version of our R helper function wrapr::let() has switched from string-based substitution to abstract syntax tree based substitution (AST based substitution, or language based substitution).

Wraprs

I am looking for some feedback from wrapr::let() users already doing substantial work with wrapr::let(). If you are already using wrapr::let() please test if the current development version of wrapr works with your code. If you run into problems: I apologize, and please file a GitHub issue.

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Posted on Categories Coding, data science, Opinion, Programming, Statistics, TutorialsTags , , , , , , , , , , 10 Comments on Non-Standard Evaluation and Function Composition in R

Non-Standard Evaluation and Function Composition in R

In this article we will discuss composing standard-evaluation interfaces (SE: parametric, referentially transparent, or “looks only at values”) and composing non-standard-evaluation interfaces (NSE) in R.

In R the package tidyeval/rlang is a tool for building domain specific languages intended to allow easier composition of NSE interfaces.

To use it you must know some of its structure and notation. Here are some details paraphrased from the major tidyeval/rlang client, the package dplyr: vignette('programming', package = 'dplyr')).

  • ":=" is needed to make left-hand-side re-mapping possible (adding yet another "more than one assignment type operator running around" notation issue).
  • "!!" substitution requires parenthesis to safely bind (so the notation is actually "(!! )", not "!!").
  • Left-hand-sides of expressions are names or strings, while right-hand-sides are quosures/expressions.

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Posted on Categories Opinion, Rants, Statistics, TutorialsTags , , 1 Comment on An easy way to accidentally inflate reported R-squared in linear regression models

An easy way to accidentally inflate reported R-squared in linear regression models

Here is an absolutely horrible way to confuse yourself and get an inflated reported R-squared on a simple linear regression model in R.

We have written about this before, but we found a new twist on the problem (interactions with categorical variable encoding) which we would like to call out here. Continue reading An easy way to accidentally inflate reported R-squared in linear regression models

Posted on Categories data science, Practical Data Science, Pragmatic Data Science, Pragmatic Machine Learning, Statistics, TutorialsTags , , , , 4 Comments on Use a Join Controller to Document Your Work

Use a Join Controller to Document Your Work

This note describes a useful replyr tool we call a "join controller" (and is part of our "R and Big Data" series, please see here for the introduction, and here for one our big data courses).

Continue reading Use a Join Controller to Document Your Work