How do you know if your model is going to work? Part 2: In-training set measures

By: , September 7th, 2015.


Authors: John Mount (more articles) and Nina Zumel (more articles).

When fitting and selecting models in a data science project, how do you know that your final model is good? And how sure are you that it’s better than the models that you rejected? In this Part 2 of our four part mini-series “How do you know if your model is going to work?” we develop in-training set measures.

Previously we worked on:

  • Part 1: Defining the scoring problem

In-training set measures

The most tempting procedure is to score your model on the data used to train it. The attraction is this avoids the statistical inefficiency of denying some of your data to the training procedure.

Run it once procedure

A common way to asses score quality is to run your scoring function on the data used to build your model. We might try comparing several models scored by AUC or deviance (normalized to factor out sample size) on their own training data as shown below.



What we have done is take five popular machine learning techniques (random forest, logistic regression, gbm, GAM logistic regression, and elastic net logistic regression) and plotted their performance in terms of AUC and normalized deviance on their own training data. For AUC larger numbers are better, and for deviance smaller numbers are better. Because we have evaluated multiple models we are starting to get a sense of scale. We should suspect an AUC of 0.7 on training data is good (though random forest achieved an AUC on training of almost 1.0), and we should be acutely aware that evaluating models on their own training data has an upward bias (the model has seen the training data, so it has a good chance of doing well on it; or training data is not exchangeable with future data for the purpose of estimating model performance).

There are two more Gedankenexperiment models that any machine data scientist should always have in mind:

  1. The null model (on the graph as “null model”). This is the performance of the best constant model (model that returns the same answer for all datums). In this case it is a model scores each and every row as having an identical 7% chance of churning. This is an important model that you want to better than. It is also a model you are often competing against as a data science as it is the “what if we treat everything in this group the same” option (often the business process you are trying to replace).

    The data scientist should always compare their work to the null model on deviance (null model AUC is trivially 0.5) and packages like logistic regression routinely report this statistic.

  2. The best single variable model (on the graph as “best single variable model”). This is the best model built using only one variable or column (in this case using a GAM logistic regression as the modeling method). This is another model the data scientist wants to out perform as it represents the “maybe one of the columns is already the answer case” (if so that would be very good for the business as they could get good predictions without modeling infrastructure).

    The data scientist should definitely compare their model to the best single variable model. Until you significantly outperform the best single variable model you have not outperformed what an analyst can find with a single pivot table.

At this point it would be tempting to pick the random forest model as the winner as it performed best on the training data. There are at least two things wrong with this idea:

Continue reading How do you know if your model is going to work? Part 2: In-training set measures

Bootstrap Evaluation of Clusters

By: , September 4th, 2015.


Illustration from Project Gutenberg

The goal of cluster analysis is to group the observations in the data into clusters such that every datum in a cluster is more similar to other datums in the same cluster than it is to datums in other clusters. This is an analysis method of choice when annotated training data is not readily available. In this article, based on chapter 8 of Practical Data Science with R, the authors discuss one approach to evaluating the clusters that are discovered by a chosen clustering method. Continue reading Bootstrap Evaluation of Clusters

How do you know if your model is going to work? Part 1: The problem

By: , September 2nd, 2015.


Authors: John Mount (more articles) and Nina Zumel (more articles).

“Essentially, all models are wrong, but some are useful.”

George Box

Here’s a caricature of a data science project: your company or client needs information (usually to make a decision). Your job is to build a model to predict that information. You fit a model, perhaps several, to available data and evaluate them to find the best. Then you cross your fingers that your chosen model doesn’t crash and burn in the real world.

We’ve discussed detecting if your data has a signal. Now: how do you know that your model is good? And how sure are you that it’s better than the models that you rejected?

Bartolomeu Velho 1568
Geocentric illustration Bartolomeu Velho, 1568 (Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris)

Notice the Sun in the 4th revolution about the earth. A very pretty, but not entirely reliable model.

In this latest “Statistics as it should be” series, we will systematically look at what to worry about and what to check. This is standard material, but presented in a “data science” oriented manner. Meaning we are going to consider scoring system utility in terms of service to a negotiable business goal (one of the many ways data science differs from pure machine learning).

To organize the ideas into digestible chunks, we are presenting this article as a four part series (to finished in the next 3 Tuesdays). This part (part 1) sets up the specific problem.

Continue reading How do you know if your model is going to work? Part 1: The problem

How Do You Know if Your Data Has Signal?

By: , August 10th, 2015.


Image by Liz Sullivan, Creative Commons. Source: Wikimedia

An all too common approach to modeling in data science is to throw all possible variables at a modeling procedure and “let the algorithm sort it out.” This is tempting when you are not sure what are the true causes or predictors of the phenomenon you are interested in, but it presents dangers, too. Very wide data sets are computationally difficult for some modeling procedures; and more importantly, they can lead to overfit models that generalize poorly on new data. In extreme cases, wide data can fool modeling procedures into finding models that look good on training data, even when that data has no signal. We showed some examples of this previously in our “Bad Bayes” blog post.

In this latest “Statistics as it should be” article, we will look at a heuristic to help determine which of your input variables have signal. Continue reading How Do You Know if Your Data Has Signal?

I was wrong about statistics

By: , August 3rd, 2015.


I’ll admit it: I have been wrong about statistics. However, that isn’t what this article is about. This article is less about some of the statistical mistakes I have made, as a mere working data scientist, and more of a rant about the hectoring tone of corrections from some statisticians (both when I have been right and when I have been wrong).

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Used wrong (image Justin Baeder, some rights reserved).

Continue reading I was wrong about statistics

Efficient accumulation in R

By: , July 27th, 2015.


R has a number of very good packages for manipulating and aggregating data (plyr, sqldf, ScaleR, data.table, and more), but when it comes to accumulating results the beginning R user is often at sea. The R execution model is a bit exotic so many R users are very uncertain which methods of accumulating results are efficient and which are inefficient.

Accumulating wheat (Photo: Cyron Ray Macey, some rights reserved)

In this latest “R as it is” (again in collaboration with our friends at Revolution Analytics) we will quickly become expert at efficiently accumulating results in R. Continue reading Efficient accumulation in R

Text encoding is a convoluted mess

By: , July 25th, 2015.


Modern text encoding is a convoluted mess where costs can easily exceed benefits. I admit we are in a world that has moved beyond ASCII (which at best served only English, and even then without full punctuation). But modern text encoding standards (utf-x, Unicode) have metastasized to the point you spend more time working around them than benefiting from them.

ASCII Code Chart-Quick ref card” by Namazu-tron – See above description. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons
Continue reading Text encoding is a convoluted mess

Working with Sessionized Data 2: Variable Selection

By: , July 15th, 2015.


In our previous post in this series, we introduced sessionization, or converting log data into a form that’s suitable for analysis. We looked at basic considerations, like dealing with time, choosing an appropriate dataset for training models, and choosing appropriate (and achievable) business goals. In that previous example, we sessionized the data by considering all possible aggregations (window widths) of the data as features. Such naive sessionization can quickly lead to very wide data sets, with potentially more features than you have datums (and collinear features, as well). In this post, we will use the same example, but try to select our features more intelligently.

4203801748 f760c22c47 zIllustration: Boris Artzybasheff
photo: James Vaughan, some rights reserved

The Example Problem

Recall that you have a mobile app with both free (A) and paid (B) actions; if a customer’s tasks involve too many paid actions, they will abandon the app. Your goal is to detect when a customer is in a state when they are likely to abandon, and offer them (perhaps through an in-app ad) a more economical alternative, for example a “Pro User” subscription that allows them to do what they are currently doing at a lower rate. You don’t want to be too aggressive about showing customers this ad, because showing it to someone who doesn’t need the subscription service is likely to antagonize them (and convince them to stop using your app).

You want to build a model that predicts whether a customer will abandon the app (“exit”) within seven days. Your training set is a set of 648 customers who were present on a specific reference day (“day 0”); their activity on day 0 and the ten days previous to that (days 1 through 10), and how many days until each customer exited (Inf for customers who never exit), counting from day 0. For each day, you constructed all possible windows within those ten days, and counted the relative rates of A events and B events in each window. This gives you 132 features per row. You also have a hold-out set of 660 customers, with the same structure. You can download the wide data set used for these examples as an .rData file here. The explanation of the variable names is in the previous post in this series.

In the previous installment, we built a regularized (ridge) logistic regression model over all 132 features. This model didn’t perform too badly, but in general there is more danger of overfitting when working with very wide data sets; in addition, it is quite expensive to analyze a large number of variables with standard implementations of logistic regression. In this installment, we will look for potentially more robust and less expensive ways of analyzing this data.

Continue reading Working with Sessionized Data 2: Variable Selection

Working with Sessionized Data 1: Evaluating Hazard Models

By: , July 8th, 2015.


When we teach data science we emphasize the data scientist’s responsibility to transform available data from multiple systems of record into a wide or denormalized form. In such a “ready to analyze” form each individual example gets a row of data and every fact about the example is a column. Usually transforming data into this form is a matter of performing the equivalent of a number of SQL joins (for example, Lecture 23 (“The Shape of Data”) from our paid video course Introduction to Data Science discusses this).


One notable exception is log data. Log data is a very thin data form where different facts about different individuals are written across many different rows. Converting log data into a ready for analysis form is called sessionizing. We are going to share a short series of articles showing important aspects of sessionizing and modeling log data. Each article will touch on one aspect of the problem in a simplified and idealized setting. In this article we will discuss the importance of dealing with time and of picking a business appropriate goal when evaluating predictive models.

For this article we are going to assume that we have sessionized our data by picking a concrete near-term goal (predicting cancellation of account or “exit” within the next 7 days) and that we have already selected variables for analysis (a number of time-lagged windows of recent log events of various types). We will use a simple model without variable selection as our first example. We will use these results to show how you examine and evaluate these types of models. In later articles we will discuss how you sessionize, how you choose examples, variable selection, and other key topics.

Continue reading Working with Sessionized Data 1: Evaluating Hazard Models