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Some vtreat design principles

We have already written quite a few times about our vtreat open source variable treatment package for R (which implements effects/impact coding, missing value replacement, and novel value replacement; among other important data preparation steps), but we thought we would take some time to describe some of the principles behind the package design.

Introduction

vtreat is something we really feel you you should add to your predictive analytics or data science work flow.


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vtreat getting a call-out from Dmitry Larko, photo Erin LeDell

vtreat’s design and implementation follows from a number of reasoned assumptions or principles, a few of which we discuss below.

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Posted on Categories Exciting Techniques, Opinion, Practical Data Science, Pragmatic Data Science, Pragmatic Machine Learning, Statistics, TutorialsTags , , , , 1 Comment on On Nested Models

On Nested Models

We have been recently working on and presenting on nested modeling issues. These are situations where the output of one trained machine learning model is part of the input of a later model or procedure. I am now of the opinion that correct treatment of nested models is one of the biggest opportunities for improvement in data science practice. Nested models can be more powerful than non-nested, but are easy to get wrong.

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A comment on preparing data for classifiers

I have been working through (with some honest appreciation) a recent article comparing many classifiers on many data sets: “Do we Need Hundreds of Classifiers to Solve Real World Classification Problems?” Manuel Fernández-Delgado, Eva Cernadas, Senén Barro, Dinani Amorim; 15(Oct):3133−3181, 2014 (which we will call “the DWN paper” in this note). This paper applies 179 popular classifiers to around 120 data sets (mostly from the UCI Machine Learning Repository). The work looks good and interesting, but we do have one quibble with the data-prep on 8 of the 123 shared data sets. Given the paper is already out (not just in pre-print) I think it is appropriate to comment publicly. Continue reading A comment on preparing data for classifiers

Posted on Categories Coding, data science, math programming, Practical Data Science, Pragmatic Data Science, Pragmatic Machine Learning, StatisticsTags , , , , , , , , 3 Comments on Vtreat: designing a package for variable treatment

Vtreat: designing a package for variable treatment

When you apply machine learning algorithms on a regular basis, on a wide variety of data sets, you find that certain data issues come up again and again:

  • Missing values (NA or blanks)
  • Problematic numerical values (Inf, NaN, sentinel values like 999999999 or -1)
  • Valid categorical levels that don’t appear in the training data (especially when there are rare levels, or a large number of levels)
  • Invalid values

Of course, you should examine the data to understand the nature of the data issues: are the missing values missing at random, or are they systematic? What are the valid ranges for the numerical data? Are there sentinel values, what are they, and what do they mean? What are the valid values for text fields? Do we know all the valid values for a categorical variable, and are there any missing? Is there any principled way to roll up category levels? In the end though, the steps you take to deal with these issues will often be the same from data set to data set, so having a package of ready-to-go functions for data treatment is useful. In this article, we will discuss some of our usual data treatment procedures, and describe a prototype R package that implements them.

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