Posted on Categories Computer Science, Mathematics, StatisticsTags , , , , Leave a comment on Why No Exact Permutation Tests at Scale?

Why No Exact Permutation Tests at Scale?

Here at Win-Vector LLC we like permutation tests. Our team has written on them (for example: How Do You Know if Your Data Has Signal?) and they are used to estimate significances in our sigr and WVPlots R packages. For example permutation methods are used to estimate the significance reported in the following ROC plot.

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Permutation tests have their own literature and issues (examples: Permutation, Parametric and Bootstrap Tests of Hypotheses, Springer-Verlag, NY, 1994 (3rd edition, 2005), 2, 3, and 4).

In our R packages the permutation tests are estimated by a sampling procedure, and not computed exactly (or deterministically). It turns out this is likely a necessary concession; a complete exact permutation test procedure at scale would be big news. Please read on for my comments on this issue.

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Posted on Categories data science, Pragmatic Data Science, Pragmatic Machine Learning, Programming, Statistics, TutorialsTags , , , , ,

Permutation Theory In Action

While working on a large client project using Sparklyr and multinomial regression we recently ran into a problem: Apache Spark chooses the order of multinomial regression outcome targets, whereas R users are used to choosing the order of the targets (please see here for some details). So to make things more like R users expect, we need a way to translate one order to another.

Providing good solutions to gaps like this is one of the thing Win-Vector LLC does both in our consulting and training practices.

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Posted on Categories Computer Science, Expository Writing, Programming, TutorialsTags , , , , , , 1 Comment on On indexing operators and composition

On indexing operators and composition

In this article I will discuss array indexing, operators, and composition in depth. If you work through this article you should end up with a very deep understanding of array indexing and the deep interpretation available when we realize indexing is an instance of function composition (or an example of permutation groups or semigroups: some very deep yet accessible pure mathematics).


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A permutation of indices

In this article I will be working hard to convince you a very fundamental true statement is in fact true: array indexing is associative; and to simultaneously convince you that you should still consider this amazing (as it is a very strong claim with very many consequences). Array indexing respecting associative transformations should not be a-priori intuitive to the general programmer, as array indexing code is rarely re-factored or transformed, so programmers tend to have little experience with the effect. Consider this article an exercise to build the experience to make this statement a posteriori obvious, and hence something you are more comfortable using and relying on.

R‘s array indexing notation is really powerful, so we will use it for our examples. This is going to be long (because I am trying to slow the exposition down enough to see all the steps and relations) and hard to follow without working examples (say with R), and working through the logic with pencil and a printout (math is not a spectator sport). I can’t keep all the steps in my head without paper, so I don’t really expect readers to keep all the steps in their heads without paper (though I have tried to organize the flow of this article and signal intent often enough to make this readable). Continue reading On indexing operators and composition