Posted on Categories data science, Expository Writing, Pragmatic Machine Learning, Statistics, TutorialsTags , , , , , , 1 Comment on What does a generalized linear model do?

What does a generalized linear model do?

What does a generalized linear model do? R supplies a modeling function called glm() that fits generalized linear models (abbreviated as GLMs). A natural question is what does it do and what problem is it solving for you? We work some examples and place generalized linear models in context with other techniques. Continue reading What does a generalized linear model do?

Posted on Categories data science, Expository Writing, Pragmatic Machine Learning, Statistics, TutorialsTags , , , , , 3 Comments on Modeling Trick: Impact Coding of Categorical Variables with Many Levels

Modeling Trick: Impact Coding of Categorical Variables with Many Levels

One of the shortcomings of regression (both linear and logistic) is that it doesn’t handle categorical variables with a very large number of possible values (for example, postal codes). You can get around this, of course, by going to another modeling technique, such as Naive Bayes; however, you lose some of the advantages of regression — namely, the model’s explicit estimates of variables’ explanatory value, and explicit insight into and control of variable to variable dependence.

Here we discuss one modeling trick that allows us to keep categorical variables with a large number of values, and at the same time retain much of logistic regression’s power.

Continue reading Modeling Trick: Impact Coding of Categorical Variables with Many Levels

Posted on Categories data science, Pragmatic Machine Learning, Statistics, TutorialsTags , , , , , ,

Modeling Trick: Masked Variables

A primary problem data scientists face again and again is: how to properly adapt or treat variables so they are best possible components of a regression. Some analysts at this point delegate control to a shape choosing system like neural nets. I feel such a choice gives up far too much statistical rigor, transparency and control without real benefit in exchange. There are other, better, ways to solve the reshaping problem. A good rigorous way to treat variables are to try to find stabilizing transforms, introduce splines (parametric or non-parametric) or use generalized additive models. A practical or pragmatic approach we advise to get some of the piecewise reshaping power of splines or generalized additive models is: a modeling trick we call “masked variables.” This article works a quick example using masked variables. Continue reading Modeling Trick: Masked Variables

Posted on Categories Mathematics, Opinion, TutorialsTags , , , 4 Comments on How to outrun a crashing alien spaceship

How to outrun a crashing alien spaceship

Hollywood movies are obsessed with outrunning explosions and outrunning crashing alien spaceships. For explosions the movies give the optimal (but unusable) solution: run straight away. For crashing alien spaceships they give the same advice, but in this case it is wrong. We demonstrate the correct angle to flee.

PrometheusRun

Running from a crashing alien spaceship, Prometheus 2012, copyright 20th Century Fox
Continue reading How to outrun a crashing alien spaceship

Posted on Categories Pragmatic Machine Learning, Rants, Statistics, TutorialsTags , , , , , , 3 Comments on Selection in R

Selection in R

The design of the statistical programming language R sits in a slightly uncomfortable place between the functional programming and object oriented paradigms. The upside is you get a lot of the expressive power of both programming paradigms. A downside of this is: the not always useful variability of the language’s list and object extraction operators.

Towards the end of our write-up Survive R we recommended using explicit environments with new.env(hash=TRUE,parent=emptyenv()), assign() and get() to simulate mutable string-keyed maps for storing results. This advice rose out of frustration with the apparent inconsistency with the user facing R list operators. In this article we bite the bullet and discuss the R list operators a bit more clearly. Continue reading Selection in R

Posted on Categories TutorialsTags , , , 13 Comments on How to remember point shape codes in R

How to remember point shape codes in R

I suspect I am not unique in not being able to remember how to control the point shapes in R. Part of this is a documentation problem: no package ever seems to write the shapes down. All packages just use the “usual set” that derives from S-Plus and was carried through base-graphics, to grid, lattice and ggplot2. The quickest way out of this is to know how to generate an example plot of the shapes quickly. We show how to do this in ggplot2. This is trivial- but you get tired of not having it immediately available. Continue reading How to remember point shape codes in R

Posted on Categories Pragmatic Machine Learning, StatisticsTags , , , , 1 Comment on Modeling Trick: the Signed Pseudo Logarithm

Modeling Trick: the Signed Pseudo Logarithm

Much of the data that the analyst uses exhibits extraordinary range. For example: incomes, company sizes, popularity of books and any “winner takes all process”; (see: Living in A Lognormal World). Tukey recommended the logarithm as an important “stabilizing transform” (a transform that brings data into a more usable form prior to generating exploratory statistics, analysis or modeling). One benefit of such transforms is: data that is normal (or Gaussian) meets more of the stated expectations of common modeling methods like least squares linear regression. So data from distributions like the lognormal is well served by a log() transformation (that transforms the data closer to Gaussian) prior to analysis. However, not all data is appropriate for a log-transform (such as data with zero or negative values). We discuss a simple transform that we call a signed pseudo logarithm that is particularly appropriate to signed wide-range data (such as profit and loss). Continue reading Modeling Trick: the Signed Pseudo Logarithm

Posted on Categories Computer Science, Opinion, Rants, TutorialsTags , , 26 Comments on Why I don’t like Dynamic Typing

Why I don’t like Dynamic Typing

A lot of people consider the static typing found in languages such as C, C++, ML, Java and Scala as needless hairshirtism. They consider the dynamic typing of languages like Lisp, Scheme, Perl, Ruby and Python as a critical advantage (ignoring other features of these languages and other efforts at generic programming such as the STL).

I strongly disagree. I find the pain of having to type or read through extra declarations is small (especially if you know how to copy-paste or use a modern IDE). And certainly much smaller than the pain of the dynamic language driven anti-patterns of: lurking bugs, harder debugging and more difficult maintenance. Debugging is one of the most expensive steps in software development- so you want incur less of it (even if it is at the expense of more typing). To be sure, there is significant cost associated with static typing (I confess: I had to read the book and post a question on Stack Overflow to design the type interfaces in Automatic Differentiation with Scala; but this is up-front design effort that has ongoing benefits, not hidden debugging debt).

There is, of course, no prior reason anybody should immediately care if I do or do not like dynamic typing. What I mean by saying this is I have some experience and observations about problems with dynamic typing that I feel can help others.

I will point out a couple of example bugs that just keep giving. Maybe you think you are too careful to ever make one of these mistakes, but somebody in your group surely will. And a type checking compiler finding a possible bug early is the cheapest way to deal with a bug (and static types themselves are only a stepping stone for even deeper static code analysis). Continue reading Why I don’t like Dynamic Typing

Posted on Categories Applications, Opinion, Pragmatic Machine Learning, Statistics, TutorialsTags , , , , , , , 6 Comments on My Favorite Graphs

My Favorite Graphs

The important criterion for a graph is not simply how fast we can see a result; rather it is whether through the use of the graph we can see something that would have been harder to see otherwise or that could not have been seen at all.

— William Cleveland, The Elements of Graphing Data, Chapter 2

In this article, I will discuss some graphs that I find extremely useful in my day-to-day work as a data scientist. While all of them are helpful (to me) for statistical visualization during the analysis process, not all of them will necessarily be useful for presentation of final results, especially to non-technical audiences.

I tend to follow Cleveland’s philosophy, quoted above; these graphs show me — and hopefully you — aspects of data and models that I might not otherwise see. Some of them, however, are non-standard, and tend to require explanation. My purpose here is to share with our readers some ideas for graphical analysis that are either useful to you directly, or will give you some ideas of your own.

Continue reading My Favorite Graphs

Posted on Categories AdministrativiaTags 1 Comment on Win-Vector starts submitting content to r-bloggers.com

Win-Vector starts submitting content to r-bloggers.com

We have been consistently impressed by and enjoyed the wealth of R wisdom available on the R-bloggers aggregation site.

Therefore Win-Vector LLC is granting the right to reformat and redistribute (with attribution and link) our blog‘s R content in the R-bloggers site and feeds.

We hope to see our R content shared through this network.